posted 11 months ago

Black Monday for Breakdowns

Today is the day that the majority of the UK goes back to work but the big question is did you make it there?

Today is one of the busiest in the entire year – never mind bank holidays, the first day back to work I January has been nicknamed Black Monday by the AA. The reason for this is that it is notorious for vehicle breakdowns according to the AA. 

An AA source told motoring.co.uk that Black Monday is notorious for breakdowns. The source said, “It will be all hands on deck from junior members of staff to senior personnel. Those motorists stranded on the roadside will be given priority whereas those with vehicles broke down at home will have to wait if we are busy but hopefully they will understand that those stranded on the roadside must be given priority.”

The AA alone expects to attend up to 15,000 call-outs – almost 17% busier than normal – and it will have extra patrols on duty.

An AA-Populus survey of 29,568 AA members found that almost a third of respondents will have at least one car standing unused throughout the festive period that will be relied on come the first day back.

AA members in Northern Ireland (31%), South East England, Wales and Eastern (all 30%) are most likely to be in this situation, compared to those in Scotland (24%) and Northern England and London (both 27%).

The first working day back in January is traditionally one of the busiest day of the year for breakdowns with flat batteries the main culprit.

Max Holdstock, AA patrol of the year, says: “The first working day back in January is traditionally one of the busiest day of the year for breakdowns with flat batteries the main culprit. The issue is that many cars get left unused for up to a fortnight in often cold conditions, which causes the power output of the battery to drop.

“If your car has been left sitting idle or has been used for mostly short, stop-start journeys, ideally trickle charge the battery. Or, if weather conditions permit, take it out before Monday for at least half an hour to boost the battery.

“When starting, it helps to switch off all the electrics and dip the clutch but, if it doesn’t fire up initially, use the starter in short five-second bursts, leaving thirty seconds between attempts to allow the battery to recover.