posted 4 years ago

Should the law change for elderly drivers?

A new report claims elderly drivers caught speeding or breaking other traffic laws should be sent on special training courses to make sure they are still safe behind the wheel

A new report claims elderly drivers caught speeding or breaking other traffic laws should be sent on special training courses to make sure they are still safe behind the wheel. The report called It's My Choice by the Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety (Pacts) said that while only 15 per cent of over-70s held a driving licence in 1975, the figure for 2010 was nearly 60 per cent. Around 80 per cent of current 60-69 year olds hold licences and will continue to drive for around the next 20 years.

New figures show that as many as six million over 70’s are now on our roads compared with less than a million 35 years ago and the report also raises the issue of mandatory retesting to make sure that age and health is not impairing the ability to control a car.

Pacts executive director Robert Gifford said "the report therefore concludes that older road users are here to stay and that a national strategy for an ageing population is vital. We have national speed awareness courses for people who are caught speeding and maybe we should have a similar course for older drivers".

Mr Gifford added "over the next decade the balance of the population in this country will change. Older people need to be kept mobile and safe. I hope that this report will generate a national discussion about the state of our pavements and the relevance of self-regulation when it comes to giving up your driving licence.”