posted 2 years ago

Why motorists love it when the clocks go back

Ten reasons why driving in the dark isn’t all bad news

1. Your car’s interior lights up like a spaceship. Admit it, the big kid in you still gets a bit giddy when those futuristic dashboard lights come on and remind you of when you used to pretend that your were at the controls of Luke Skywalker’s X-wing fighter.


2. That scratch isn’t anywhere near so noticeable any more. You know the one: a car park scuff picked up when leaving the family saloon too close to someone else’s van outside Aldi. Yes, you’ve been meaning to get it fixed for ages. Now you’ll hardly notice it.

Scratched car

3. You can wear what you like – or nothing at all. Driving in the dark means not being seen at the wheel. If you want to wear your One Direction onesie on the way home from work, then it’s up to you.


4. You finally notice that one of your bulbs isn’t working. There’s a reason people have been flashing at you. Their lights that is. It might seem obvious but many people who have driven all summer with a failed bulb often only realise when they start to drive in the dark. Have a friend or family member stand outside the car while you test every bulb is working. Unless you have a fancy exec model which tells you things like that automatically, of course.


5. You remember to clean your windscreen. Darker nights mean that maximising the visibility through your windscreen is essential. This might the one time in the year that you agree to hand over a pound to the squeegee lady at the traffic lights.


6. You can put off buying a new car. Having the latest flash motor doesn’t matter so much when no-one can see it. That said, now might be a good time to try and bag a bargain down at your local dealership.

Old Car

7. You don’t have to wash your car. Let’s face it, no-one really enjoys washing their car. With little or no sunlight to reflect from a perfectly polished bonnet, there’s probably no point in picking up a chamois leather for a good few months.

Muddy Car

8. You become a more considerate road user. Taking care not to hit a cyclist or pedestrian becomes a full-time job during the darker driving days and nights. Slowing down and keeping your eyes peeled for other road users are just some of the good habits you’ll pick up.


9. You won’t get stuck behind a caravan. Even the most ardent caravanners tend to leave the tourer in storage during the darker months.

Caravan Traffic

10. It will give you an excuse to play with your clock. And in the case of the very expensive Bentley clock used to illustrate this article, that means getting some pleasure out of an in-car gadget which doesn’t get much attention during the rest of the year.

Bently Clock


Why choose Boxster to point out about failed bulbs? The car will inform you automatically should a bulb fail and if I owned it the bulb would be replaced immediately, who the hell composed this piece of c**p

What poe-faced responses to an obviously light-hearted article, which I thought was quite amusing. Some people need to get a sense of humour.

What a poor excuse for an article, yes i must remember to switch my lights on, no i do that cause its dark, yes i must watch for cyclists, no i do that anyway, oh yes and putting the clock back reminded me to buy a new car ! What complete rubbish, choose better, choose better journalists !

As I recall a test was done back in 1970 when the clocks stayed at BST all autumn/winter long. Who complained? The farmers and schools in Scotland, where the mornings were still dark at 9.00am. Is it now time to re-adjust to European time and ditch GMT?

What an awful excuse for an article

You do realise that by putting the clocks back all were really doing is getting up an hour later and going to bed an hour later. And now the mornings are going to be lighter because were getting up later. So nothing in this article makes sense really.